This principle is about using water efficiently, protecting local water resources and reducing flooding and drought.

For example: access to water, reducing demand, water reuse, water treatment, flood risk management, embodied water in products and services and anything else we think is important.

One Planet Goals for sustainable water:

  • Everyone to have access to clean drinking water
  • Use water efficiently and returned to the environment clean
  • Manage water sustainably and reduce the risk and impact of flooding and drought

Are there any issues or goals specific to Bruton?

What is Bruton doing already?

Who can contribute to this?

What more can we do?

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Comments

  • Transferred from main Forum on 14 May 2019

    Christine Kaltoft May 8, 2019 at 9:01am
    A question for the sustainable water group: given that we're in the South West, how much of an issue is water saving? Obviously in some places water is an absolutely key issue (as it might become here with climate change) but in our currently wet part of the world is it more important to focus on water quality than water economy? I understand it's now 40 years since Wessex water had to impose any restrictions on water use here.
    (Wessex Water's magazine - winter 2018https://www.wessexwater.co.uk/...)
    Reply Delete
    https://www.wessexwater.co.uk/-/media/files/wessexwater/magazine-wi...


    Jane Durney (Allwood) > Christine Kaltoft May 8, 2019 at 11:27am
    Good point.
    We live in a far less water-stressed region than other parts of the country. In Hertfordshire where I used to live, the drought of 2010 to early 2012 meant that the local water company was on the verge of introducing standpipes and water tankers before it started to rain. All water in that company's area is abstracted from rivers and groundwater aquifers; they don't have any reservoirs that supply the water network. I have a picture of Tring reservoir (which feeds the Grand Union Canal) from that time with a depth gauge standing proud of the mud! I remember everyone breathing a sigh of relief when it rained but memories are short.
    Treating water to drinking water standards and pumping it through the mains water network uses energy and resources. Water is heavy to transport (even via pipes). The energy used for this has a carbon cost which is a good reason to use less! Using less also means lower bills where water is metered.
    Wessex Water has some good advice for water saving in the home and garden. How do we get more people to do this?
    https://www.wessexwater.co.uk/help-and-advice/your-water/save-water...
    https://www.wessexwater.co.uk/help-and-advice/your-water/save-water...
    Improving the water quality in the Brue is also important so the Yellow Fish initiative that I think BrueCREW are thinking about doing would help. (https://www.gov.uk/government/publications/avoiding-pollution-yello...) Quite a few places have adopted this, e.g. Peterborough, River Kennet, Swindon, Bristol... Volunteers mark drains that flow to the river with the yellow fish logo to remind people that only rain should go down the drain. Engaging with landowners upstream is important too to prevent run-off and soil erosion.

    Reply Delete

    Saving water in the home | Wessex Water
    An informative guide to saving water in your home helping retain water while reducing your bills and being conciseness of sustainability and the envi…

    Jane Durney (Allwood) > Jane Durney (Allwood) May 8, 2019 at 4:23pm
    Water is a very local issue and so demands solutions specific to the particular location.
    The process of storing, treating and transporting water has a wide range of environmental impacts and a carbon footprint, even in water-rich areas, so it should always be used efficiently.
    Reply Delete
    https://www.wessexwater.co.uk/-/media/files/wessexwater/magazine-wi...
  • Possible outcomes for Bruton:
    Fewer leaks
    Better water efficiency
    More water fountains
    Water as an energy resource
  • Notes from 8 April 2019 workshop:

    CHALLENGES
    Not pollute our water
    No chemicals

    OPPORTUNITIES
    Research enzyme usage in loos & public [conveniences]

    WHAT'S HAPPENING IN BRUTON NOW?
    BrueCREW
    Rainwater tank [At The Chapel]
    Waterless urinals / enzymes [At The Chapel]

    FUTURE ACTIONS TOWARDS PRINCIPLE
    Water saving initiatives / Water board [Wessex Water]
    Adopt toilet rules [If it's mellow, let it yellow]
    Capture rain water
    Choose Eco programme
    Report water leaks
    Using renewable containers
    Use enzymes instead of chemicals
    Shower instead of bathing
    Use grey water
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